Immigrant Rights

Laws passed targeting immigrants are eventually extended to all citizens; for this reason, basic civil liberties, like the right to due process, must be protected for everyone. While the Constitution does not give people the right to enter the U.S., it protects them once they are here from discrimination based on race and national origin and from arbitrary treatment by the government.

Help Keep Families Together Through Immigration Reform

Update: On June 27, 2013, thanks to an outpouring of support from all around the country the U.S Senate passed comprehensive immigration reform through S. 744, a bill which moves our country one step closer to putting aspiring …

Update: On June 27, 2013, thanks to an outpouring of support from all around the country the U.S Senate passed comprehensive immigration reform through S. 744, a bill which moves our country one step closer to putting aspiring Americans on the path to citizenship.

This bill is an important first step, but our work is far from complete. The legislation still needs approval from the U.S. House and we remain concerned about the border militarization and employer verifications provisions within the bill. We will continue to keep you updated on the status of this legislation and provide you with opportunities to make your voice heard.


Immigration legislation is finally headed to the full U.S. Senate.

Congress has an opportunity to make history by giving millions of aspiring Americans who contribute to our country every day the opportunity to earn citizenship.

Local Enforcement of Federal Immigration Laws

Introduced in February 2011, Ohio Senate Bill 98 would allow local police to enforce immigration laws, potentially leading to mistaken arrests, racial profiling, and the misdirection of funds away from basic protective services.

In 2007, the Ohio Attorney General …

Introduced in February 2011, Ohio Senate Bill 98 would allow local police to enforce immigration laws, potentially leading to mistaken arrests, racial profiling, and the misdirection of funds away from basic protective services.

In 2007, the Ohio Attorney General issued an opinion advising that Ohio law permits county sheriffs to enter into agreements with the federal government to enforce criminal violations of immigration law, but Ohio law prohibits sheriffs from enforcing civil violations of immigration law.

Laws passed targeting immigrants are eventually extended to all citizens; for this reason, basic civil liberties, like the right to due process, must be protected for everyone. While the Constitution does not give people the right to enter the U.S., it protects them once they are here from discrimination based on race and national origin and from arbitrary treatment by the government.

Help Keep Families Together Through Immigration Reform

Update: On June 27, 2013, thanks to an outpouring of support from all around the country the U.S Senate passed comprehensive immigration reform through S. 744, a bill which moves our country one step closer to putting aspiring …

Update: On June 27, 2013, thanks to an outpouring of support from all around the country the U.S Senate passed comprehensive immigration reform through S. 744, a bill which moves our country one step closer to putting aspiring Americans on the path to citizenship.

This bill is an important first step, but our work is far from complete. The legislation still needs approval from the U.S. House and we remain concerned about the border militarization and employer verifications provisions within the bill. We will continue to keep you updated on the status of this legislation and provide you with opportunities to make your voice heard.


Immigration legislation is finally headed to the full U.S. Senate.

Congress has an opportunity to make history by giving millions of aspiring Americans who contribute to our country every day the opportunity to earn citizenship.

Arizona’s Anti-Immigration Law

In April 2010, Arizona Governor Jan Brewer signed SB 1070, an anti-immigrant law that effectively requires police to engage in racial profiling. MALDEF, the ACLU, and the National Immigration Law Center announced that they will sue to block the law …

In April 2010, Arizona Governor Jan Brewer signed SB 1070, an anti-immigrant law that effectively requires police to engage in racial profiling. MALDEF, the ACLU, and the National Immigration Law Center announced that they will sue to block the law from going into effect. The U.S. Department of Justice has also sued, and several of the laws provisions have been blocked, pending the case’s resolution. Read more. Arizona v. United States went before the U.S. Supreme Court on April 25, 2012 where the Justices heard the arguments on provisions that are being challenged in SB 1070. The Court is expected to announce their ruling in June. Click here to read the fact sheet on SB 1070.

The law has inspired similar laws in other states, including Alabama. In response to these unconstitutional laws, the ACLU of Ohio issued a travel advisory and wallet card for Ohioans to protect themselves from unfair racial profiling and inform them of their rights when stopped by police. Click here to view the press release and materials. En Español.

Let’s stand united to end discriminatory policies that unfairly target racial minorities. Sign the online petition and urge President Obama to put a stop to such laws such as Arizona SB 1070. En Español.

Reform Is Needed

The ACLU believes immigration policies can be reformed and still respect civil liberties. To that end, the ACLU opposes any policies that include:

mandatory detention and/or deportation of anyone that an immigration officer thinks is an undocumented person;
requiring or encouraging local …

The ACLU believes immigration policies can be reformed and still respect civil liberties. To that end, the ACLU opposes any policies that include:

  • mandatory detention and/or deportation of anyone that an immigration officer thinks is an undocumented person;
  • requiring or encouraging local authorities to enforce federal immigration laws;
  • indefinitely detaining an undocumented person who can’t be returned to his/her home country of origin for political or other reasons;
  • removing constitutional due process protections and access to the courts for immigrants;
  • requiring employers to stand in the place of immigration agents by verifying worker eligibility using federal databases; or
  • requiring a biometric national ID.